Can You Name This Historic Covered Bridge?

In 1958, after a new bridge was built downstream, it was closed to auto traffic, but it still sees plenty of foot traffic.

Where in Maine? June 2024
Photo by Benjamin Williamson
From our June 2024 issue

One of only eight historic covered bridges left in Maine, this one might be the fairest of them all — it’s at least drawn its fair share of admirers, including plein-air painters and photographers, over the span of its more than 150 years. The largely hand-hewn bridge comprises intricate wooden trusses, a wood-shingled gable roof, and a granite foundation sturdy enough to see it through some major floods of its typically tranquil, eponymous river (whose name possesses alpine connotations). In 1958, after a new bridge was built downstream, the state closed this one to auto traffic, but it still sees plenty of foot traffic, and it has become popular as a wedding venue (since it’s a public space and can’t be reserved, knot-tiers need to be okay with interlopers and lookie-loos). So popular, in fact, that the state instituted some rather Footloose-esque restrictions to preserve structural integrity: no more than 50 people allowed at one time, no candles or open fires, no marching in cadence, and no dancing. That about covers it.

Submit your answer below. We’ll feature our favorite letter in an upcoming issue — and send the winner a Down East wall calendar.

May 2024, Down East Magazine

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