Where in Maine

bridge and the towns

Photograph by Benjamin Williamson

Know the name of this bridge and the towns that it links?

Washington Augustus Roebling, of Trenton, New Jersey, was eight years off completion of the Brooklyn Bridge — you know, kind of a big deal — when his engineering firm, John A. Roebling’s Sons Company, got a request from a scrappy cabal of land developers in Maine. They wanted a pedestrian bridge that’d link their new housing development (on one side of this handsome river) with the cotton mill (on the other side) where many of their prospective residents worked. The Roebling team used the wire-rope suspension for which they were famous and wrapped construction in 1892. A century and a quarter later, the bridge has benefited from a few facelifts, including a substantial structural restoration in 2006, but it retains its original cables and the gentle bounce that earned it its nickname. Today, the bridge is beloved by recreational walkers and cyclists, who enjoy downstream views of gentle rapids, a pretty little island where settlers pastured their goats, and the brick mill buildings where cotton was once spun into yarn. In this photo, you can glimpse the roof of one of the former tenements that housed millworkers — although not the ones lucky enough to live on the photographer’s side of the river, who got to cross this lovely bridge every day.

❯❯ Submit your answer below. We’ll feature our favorite letter in an upcoming issue — and send the winner a Down East wall calendar.




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