November 2006

Features

Bangor’s Warm Welcome

Bangor is the first and last stop on U.S. soil for hundreds of thousands of soldiers. A dedicated group of Mainers puts politics aside to say thanks.

  • By: Joshua F. Moore
  • Photography by: Kip Brundage

The Great Divide

How did Maine’s relationship with Quebec get so cracked?

  • By: Al Diamon
  • Illustrations by: Dean MacAdam

Fine Lines

A waterfront home brings a touch of modernity to Islesboro.

  • By: Michaela Cavallaro
  • Photography by: Brian Vanden Brink

Weird, Wonderful, & Woolen

In the hands of one acclaimed Cushing artist, knitting goes way beyond warm sweaters and socks.

  • By: Rebecca Martin Evarts
  • Illustrations by: Benjamin Magro

Where The Wild Things Are

The strange world of undersea life is even stranger than you think.

  • By: Thomas Urquhart

Westbrook’s New Groove

How a plucky little mill town stole Portland’s mojo.

  • By: Edgar Allen Beem
  • Photography by: Jeffrey Stevensen

Comfort Food

A forgotten Maine seafood dish might just be primed for a comeback.

  • By: Ken Textor

Maine’s Most Dangerous Jobs

From potato farmers to loggers to lobstermen, Mainers have long risked life and limb to make a living. But thanks to innovative safety programs the rate of on-the-job injuries has dropped significantly.

  • By: Rob Sneddon

Departments

Where in Maine?

If you’re the largest sardine cannery in the eastern United States, in fact the only remaining sardine cannery on the eastern seaboard, you’ve earned the right to have a gigantic, sou’wester-wearing fisherman as your symbol. Especially if you’re located in a photogenic community along the Maine coast.

North by East

Opinions, advisories, and musings from the length and breadth of Maine

Wild in the Streets

Without hunters and trappers, suburbia has suddenly become a jungle.

  • By: Jeff Clark

Trouble with TABOR

We noted with interest your article regarding Maine’s upcoming consideration of the Taxpayer Bill of Rights (“Tax Wars: The Sequel,” September 2006). As residents of Colorado, which has enacted its own TABOR amendment, and as summer visitors to Maine, we thought you might consider the following factors

Editor’s Note

We were putting the finishing touches on this issue’s cover story when word came in that longtime Down East Books author Elisabeth Ogilvie had passed away at the age of eighty-nine. Her faithful readers will be comforted to hear that she died peacefully at her home in Cushing. The author of forty-six

  • By: Paul Doiron

The Complete Maine Winter Planner

Eeeyhaa! The Farmer’s Almanac says Maine is in the crosshairs this year for a serious dumping of snow. And after last year’s snow drought, don’t we deserve a little extra serving of the white stuff? Luckily, Maine is one of the best winter playgrounds in the East. The state’s two largest ski areas offer

Nightmare on June Street

When the real estate property tax bills show up, you can feel our spirits droop.

  • By: Charlotte Albright

Shooting for a Tax Break

Cabela’s argues it should be treated differently.

November

Dance Culture Shock Start with Stravinsky’s seminal composition The Firebird. Then add original hip-hop beats and a troupe of eight dancers from the United States, Colombia, and Japan who’ve worked with Jurassic 5 and Diddy. The result? Not your typical ballet. DecaDanceTheatre vs. The Firebird comes

Inside Maine

Dining Open House Kittery’s intimate, sophisticated Anneke Jans offers clever twists on classic food. Anneke Jans is proof that sometimes dreams do come true. The popular Kittery restaurant is the creation of a Cape Neddick couple who always wanted to own a restaurant. With no experience in the industry,

Dam Diver

A brave crew helped harness the Penobscot River’s power in 1923.

  • By: Joshua F. Moore

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